A criminal conviction is devastating. It can mean jail time, a lengthy prison sentence, fines and other penalties that affect a person’s family, finances and future. Even if a person receives probation as part of a sentence, it can be quite some time before he or she can put the unfortunate situation behind them.

It can become even more difficult to do this if you are accused and convicted of a probation violation. Not only could you face penalties for the violation, the courts could also order you to fulfill the terms of your original sentence. As such, it is crucial that you avoid any probation violations, including those we discuss below.

  • Missing even one court date
  • Missing a scheduled meeting with your probation officer
  • Leaving the state without permission
  • Failing to pay court-ordered fines
  • Using illegal drugs
  • Drinking (if sobriety is a condition of your probation)
  • Violating protective orders
  • Associating with certain people
  • Getting arrested

Even accusations of these or other violations can be enough to get a person in serious trouble, so you must do whatever you can to avoid these actions and others that might seem suspicious or non-compliant.

People on probation are under far more scrutiny than other people. Even minor missteps can land a person back in court and facing lengthy jail sentences and added charges.

Considering all that is at stake, it is crucial that you understand the terms of probation and what is expected of you. If you have questions or concerns, don’t take the risk of assuming you can just explain yourself later or plead ignorance. Instead, talk to your attorney to protect yourself, your record and your future.

And if you have been wrongfully accused of a probation violation, your attorney can help you build a defense so that a wrongful accusation doesn’t turn into a wrongful conviction.